ICKSMCB 2015 / International Conference of the Korean Society for Molecular and Cellular Biology / Oct.9 (Wed) ~ 11 (Fri), 2013 / COEX, Gangnam, Seoul, Korea

Symposia

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September 12 (Tue), 2017

Young Investigators' Session
September 12 (Tue), 10:00-11:36, Rm. 300
Dae-Eun Jeong (Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Korea)
Kibaek Choe (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Korea)
Taejeong Ha (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Korea)
Jongbo Lee (Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Korea)
Eunha Kim (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Korea)
Heehwa Son (Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Korea)
Youngeun Kim (University of Seoul, Korea)
Jaeyoun Kim (Seoul National University, Korea)


Chair : Yoon Ki Kim, Ph.D. (Korea University, Korea)
Young Investigators' Session
September 12 (Tue), 10:00-11:36, Rm. 307
Jin-Ku Lee (Samsung Medical Center, Korea)
Hui Kwon Kim (Yonsei University College of Medicine, Korea)
Hyungseok Seo (Seoul National University, Korea)
Ho-Soo Lee (Ajou University School of Medicine Korea)
Ja Hyun Koo (Seoul National University, Korea)
Sung Wook Park (Seoul National University/Seoul National University Hospital, Korea)
Ramu Gopalappa (Yonsei University College of Medicine, Korea)
Dong Hoon Kang (Ewha Womans University, Korea)


Chair : Sung Wook Chi, Ph.D. (Korea University, Korea)
Young Investigators' Session
September 12 (Tue), 10:00-11:36, Rm. 308
You-Hyang Song (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Korea)
Han Kyu Lee (Duke University Medical Center, Durham, USA)
Eunkyung Lie (Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Korea)
Min Jee Kwon (Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), Korea)
Yongjin Yoo (Seoul National University College of Medicine, Korea)
Ganesh M. Nawkar (Gyeongsang National University, Korea)
Geun-Don Kim (Korea University, Korea)
Changho Kang (Gyeongsang National University, Korea)


Chair : Ja-Hyun Baik, Ph.D. (Korea University, Korea)
Dae-Jin Yun, Ph.D. (Konkuk University, Korea)
AMOREPACIFIC Symposium
September 12 (Tue), 10:00-11:40, Rm. 401
Jung A Kim (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Korea)
Ji Eun Oh (Yale University School of Medicine, USA)
Hyuncheol Lee (Chungnam National University, Korea)
Hanbin Jeong (Ulsan National Institute o Science of Technology (UNIST), Korea)
Bongki Cho (Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), Korea)


Chair : In Hye Lee, Ph.D. (Ewha Womans University, Korea)
Global Network Session
September 12 (Tue), 10:00-11:40, Rm. 402
Muhammad Fazril Mohd Razif, Ph.D. (University of Malaya, Malaysia)
Vivian A. Panes, Ph.D. (Ateneo De Manila University, Philippines)
Sagar Sengupta, Ph.D. (National Institute of Immunology, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, India)
Jiang Jianming, Ph.D. (National University of Singapore, Singapore)
Four outstanding speakers have been recommended by each biological society in Malaysia, Philippines, India and Singapore. The speakers will discuss their recent findings on the diverse aspects of molecular and cellular biology, ranging from the biochemical bases underlying photosynthesis to the epigenetic regulation during development. Given living organisms have evolved with genetic diversity, this special session adds a unique atmosphere to the 2017 conference of the KSMCB to strengthen our understanding of Nature, and enrich our experience at the meeting.

Organizer & Chair : Marc Diederich, Ph.D. (Seoul National University, Korea)

Sym. 01. Crop Breeding by Genome-Editing
September 12 (Tue), 13:00-15:00, Rm. 300
Stefan Jansson, Ph.D. (Umea University, Sweden)
Jin-Soo Kim, Ph.D. (Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Korea)
Yinong Yang, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania State University, USA)
Ju-Kon Kim, Ph.D. (Seoul National University, Korea)
Genome-editing is going to generate new crop varieties with desirable traits that can satisfy the various demands for global agriculture. As one of the new plant breeding techniques, genome-editing allows plant breeding without introducing a transgene, and this has led to new challenges for the regulation and social acceptance of genome-edited crops. This modern technology can produce novel plants that are similar or identical to those generated by conventional breeding techniques, thus creating indistinct boundaries with regards to genetically modified organism(GMO) regulations. Therefore an appropriate regulatory response is required towards the social acceptance of genome-edited crops. In this symposium, we review the recent development of genome-editing of crops and propose a concept of appropriate regulatory models by unraveling the indistinct boundaries.

Organizer & Chair: Ju-Kon Kim, Ph.D. (Seoul National University, Korea)
Sym. 02. Social Behaviors Modulated by Synaptic and Circuit Mechanisms
September 12 (Tue), 13:00-14:50, Rm. 307
Eunee Lee, M.D., Ph.D. (Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Korea)
Eunji Cheong, Ph.D.(Yonsei University, Korea)
Se-Young Choi, Ph.D. (Seoul National University School of Dentistry, Korea)
Gloria Choi, Ph.D. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), USA)
Almost all biological organisms live at least partly in social environments constructed from emergent social organizations beyond individuals, structures ranging from dyads and families to groups and cultures. During past three decades, rapid advancements in molecular, cellular, and genetic methodologies, in addition to cutting-edge imaging technologies such as super-resolution and multi-photon microscopy, optogenetics, and fiber photometry, have accelerated the investigation of mechanisms underlying social cognitions. This symposium will bring together neuroscientists who are working on elucidation of synaptic and/or circuit mechanisms underlying various social behaviors. They will also discuss the implication of their research areas in relevant brain disorders, and further stimulate new directions in neuroscience research. An introduction to this topic will be provided by Dr. Jaewon Ko, and then four speakers will discuss their recent research programs that aim to understand social cognition at various levels.

Organizer & Chair: Jaewon Ko, Ph.D. (Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), Korea
Sym. 03. The Control of Translation and RNA Degradation
September 12 (Tue), 13:00-14:50, Rm. 308
Jin-Wu Nam, Ph.D. (Hanyang University, Korea)
Jae-Sung Woo, Ph.D. (Korea University, Korea)
Daehyun Baek, Ph.D. (Seoul National University, Korea)
Huili Guo, Ph.D. (Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Singapore)
Yoon Ki Kim, Ph.D. (Korea University, Korea)
Recent advances in high-throughput transcriptome and translatome sequencing technologies have facilitated the discovery of new principles and mechanisms of post-transcriptional and translational regulation in gene expression. High-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and ribosome footprinting sequencing (Ribo-seq) experiments have been applied to recent studies that identified many noncoding elements, controlling translation and RNA degradation in Eukaryotic systems. In this symposium, speakers will present their fascinating works, regarding general rules of miRNA targeting that controls translation and RNA stability and new mechanism of post-transcriptional silencing occurred during translation.

Organizer & Chair: Jin-Wu Nam, Ph.D. (Hanyang University, Korea),
Sym. 04 Regulation of Metabolic Signaling and Disease
September 12 (Tue), 13:00-15:00, Rm. 401
Young Il Yeom, Ph.D. (Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), Korea)
Jung Weon Lee, Ph.D. (Seoul National University, Korea)
Suyong Choi, Ph.D. (University of Wisconsin, USA)
Jae Bum Kim, Ph.D. (Seoul National University, Korea)
Marc Diederich, Ph.D. (Seoul National University, Korea)
Diverse human diseases can be driven by chronical abnormalities in metabolic activities to regulate the levels of diverse biomolecules and cellular components. Fibrosis, diabetes, and cancers are currently being challenged via our exploring the metabolic fields, especially signaling molecules or pathways enough to be regulatory by re-programing or application of therapeutically-purposed reagents. This meeting will include diverse metabolic aspects to define commonalities and differences in metabolic pathways and their regulations, and to determine the role of these processes for physiology and disease states. Such metabolic signaling pathways for lactate, amino acid, and lipid, and involving p53 and autophagy would be covered by outstanding researchers focused on diverse pathways, cell types, or diseases.

Organizer & Chair: Jung Weon Lee, Ph.D. (Seoul National University, Korea)
Sym. 05 Host Responses to Immune Stimuli
September 12 (Tue), 13:00-15:00, Rm. 402
Eui-Cheol Shin, M.D., Ph.D. (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and technology (KAIST), Korea)
Hiroshi Ohno, M.D., Ph.D. (RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences, Japan)
Sophie Valkenburg, Ph.D. (HKU-Pasteur, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong)
Sang-Jun Ha, Ph.D. (Yonsei University, Korea)
Host response to immune stimuli is a highly complex multi-step process orchestrated by the host immune systems to fight pathogens. This session will highlight examples of how viruses and parasites induce defense mechanism and how a universal influenza vaccine may led to protective immunity. In addition, the session will also address dysregulated host response to non-foreign immune stimuli leading to auto-immune responses.

Organizer & Chair : Wang-Shick Ryu, Ph.D. (Institut Pasteur Korea (IPK), Korea)

September 13 (Wed), 2017

Sym. 06 Molecular Mechanism of Airway Inflammation
               : Differences in the Upper and Lower Airway
September 13 (Wed), 09:10-11:10, Rm. 300
Ji-Hwan Ryu, Ph.D. (Yonsei University College of Medicine, Korea)
De-Yun Wang, M.D., Ph.D. (National University of Singapore, Singapore)
Wenju Lu, Ph.D. (Guangzhou Medical University, China)
Jong-Seok Moon, Ph.D. (Soonchunhyang University, Korea)
Airway diseases characterized by inflammation, excessive secretion, and airway obstruction affect a substantial proportion of the population. Production of chemokines, cytokines, and growth factors in response to irritants, infectious agents, and inflammatory mediators plays an important role in the modulation of acute and chronic airway inflammation. Data accumulated over the last century have shown that inflammatory diseases in upper airway and lower airway often occur together and share a common genetic background. However, immunologic conditions of the nasal and lung mucosa are not identical because the nasal mucosa is continuously exposed to various microorganisms and aeroallergens, while the lung mucosa is only occasionally infected with a few microbes. This session will feature 4 internationally recognized speakers who will present recent findings on the genes and/or cellular factors controlling the immune cell function in the airway inflammatory diseases. This session will help us to understand how inflammatory diseases in upper or lower airway is triggered and mediated by specific regulatory immune mechanisms and how mitochondrial dysfunction acts as a regulator of inflammation and cell death, which are useful to develop specific therapeutics for airway inflammatory diseases.

Organizer & Chair: Joo-Heon Yoon, M.D., Ph.D. (Yonsei University College of Medicine, Korea)
Sym. 07 Interaction between Hepatitis Viruses and Host
September 13 (Wed), 09:10-11:10, Rm. 307
Seong-Jun Kim, Ph.D. (Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology (KRICT), Korea)
Takaji Wakita, M.D., Ph.D. (National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Japan)
Kyun-Hwan Kim, Ph.D. (Konkuk University, Korea)
Pil Soo Sung, M.D., Ph.D. (The Catholic University of Korea, Korea)
Several human viruses have hepatotropism; that is, they preferentially infect hepatocytes and cause liver inflammation, which is known as viral hepatitis. Among them, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection often progresses to chronic persistent infection. Although hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection spontaneously resolves in more than 90% of infected adults, HBV can sometimes result in chronic persistent infection, particularly when neonates are infected through vertical transmission. As a result, approximately 170 million and 350 million people worldwide are chronically infected with HCV and HBV, respectively, and infected individuals are at an increased risk of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. In the present symposium entitled 'interaction between hepatitis viruses and host', we will discuss current knowledges on the mechanisms how HCV or HBV interacts with host cells for viral replication and immune evasion.

Organizer & Chair: Eui-Cheol Shin, M.D., Ph.D. (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Korea)
Sym. 08 Exosome: From Biology to Applications
September 13 (Wed), 09:10-11:10, Rm. 308
Yoosoo Yang, Ph.D. (Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Korea)
Stephen Gould, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins University, USA)
Sai Kiang Lim, Ph.D. (A*STAR Institute of Medical Biology, Singapore)
Yong Woo Cho, Ph.D. (Hanyang University ERICA, Korea)
Exosomes, nanometer-sized membranous vesicles play a major role in intercellular communication due to their ability to transfer proteins and nucleic acids from one cell to another. Their roles as mediators in intercellular communication and regulators of the cellular niche, provoke us to study their roles in disease pathogenesis as well as use exosomes as not only therapeutics but also drug delivery vehicles. Furthermore, with respect to their host attributes, we could expect that they may show different biological effects and/or targeting specificity, which can meet the needs of precision medicine as the next generation of therapeutics. This session will highlight innovative science and technologies covering from biology to manipulation of exosomes for developing therapeutics.

Organizer & Chair: In-San Kim, Ph.D. (Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Korea)
Sym. 09 Chromatin Dynamics in Cell Cycle
September 13 (Wed), 09:10-11:10, Rm. 401
Hyeseong Cho, Ph.D. (Ajou University School of Medicine, Korea)
Jongbum Kwon, Ph.D. (Ewha Womans University, Korea)
Ja Yil Lee, Ph.D. (Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST),Korea)
In young Park, Ph.D. (Baylor College of Medicine, USA)
Chromatin in proliferating cells is highly dynamic and its dynamic feature is driven by two important factors during the cell cycle. First, histones are one of the primary components of chromatin and canonical histones are actively synthesized and incorporated into the synthesized DNA during S-phase. Second, many chromatin remodeling complexes and their components such as RSF1 and BAP1 cooperate with modified histones (PTMs) and contribute to global chromatin restructuring during DNA replication and transcriptional regulation. In addition, ATAD2 is discovered as an epigenetic reader of newly synthesized histone marks.In this session, five speakers will talk about the recent advances and tools in chromatin dynamics.

Organizer & Chair: Hyeseong Cho, Ph.D. (Ajou University School of Medicine, Korea)
Sym. 10 New Trends in Structural Biology
              : High Resolution Cryo Electron Microscopy
September 13 (Wed), 09:10-11:15, Rm. 402
Jaekyung Hyun, Ph.D. (Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI), Korea)
Soung-Hun Roh, Ph.D. (SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, USA)
Alexey Amunts, Ph.D. (Stockholm University, Sweden
Ho Min Kim, Ph.D. (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Korea
Matthias Wolf, Ph.D. (Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate School University (OIST), Japan)
Hyun Suk Jung, Ph.D. (Kangwon National University, Korea)
Structural biology has been contributing tremendously to understanding molecular mechanism of life. However, obtaining high resolution structures of large multi-subunit complexes have been challenging due to the technical limitations. Due to recent advances in cryo Electron Microscopy (EM), cryo EM emerges as a major tool to enable us to visualize large complexes in atomic details. In this session, we will discuss this new trend in structural biology focusing on cryo Electron Microscopy.

Organizer & Chair: Ji-Joon Song, Ph.D. (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Korea)
Sym. 11 Molecular Mechanisms of Plant Immunity
September 13 (Wed), 16:00-17:55, Rm. 300
Doil Choi, Ph.D. (Seoul National University, Korea)
Jian-Min Zhou, Ph.D. (Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), China)
Choong-Min Ryu, Ph.D. (Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), Korea)
Kee Hoon Sohn, Ph.D. (Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Korea)
Ohkmae K. Park, Ph.D. (Korea University, Korea)
Plants have multiple layers of immunity to protect themselves from pathogen and herbivore attacks. Resistance to most pathogens, termed nonhost resistance, is considered the most durable and efficient immune response of plants but yet remains elusive. Plants possess numerous pattern recognition receptors that recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and activate PAMP-triggered immunity. However, some pathogens have evolved to suppress this basal immunity by delivering various effectors into plant cells, resulting in disease development. Plants in turn have evolved a second, enhanced immune system, referred to as effector-triggered immunity, which requires plant resistance proteins for specific recognition of effectors and causes rapid, localized cell death termed hypersensitive response. Speakers will talk and discuss about various immune systems, and this will enhance our understanding of plant immunity.

Organizer & Chair: Ohkmae K. Park, Ph.D. (Korea University, Korea)
Sym. 12 Transposable Elements: From Evolution to Disease
September 13 (Wed), 16:00-18:00, Rm. 307
Mina Rho, Ph.D. (Hanyang University, Korea)
Jae-Won Huh, Ph.D. (Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), Korea)
So Nakagawa, Ph.D. (Tokai University of Medicine, Korea)
Hong-Jin Kim, Ph.D. (Chung-Ang University, Korea)
Transposable elements also known as "jumping genes" or transposons, are sequences of DNA that move (or jump) from one location in the genome to another. Transposable elements have dynamically moved and changed genomes to affect evolution and diseases significantly. This symposium deals with recent studies about Transposable elements from evolution to diseases.

Organizer & Chair: Heui-Soo Kim, Ph.D. (Pusan National University, Korea)
Sym. 13 Nano-Biomedical Convergence for Translational Research on Retinopathy
September 13 (Wed), 16:00-18:00, Rm. 308
Jeong-Hun Kim, M.D., Ph.D. (Seoul National University College of Medicine, Korea)
Marcus Fruttiger, Ph.D. (University College London, United Kingdom)
Noo Li Jeon, Ph.D. (Seoul National University, Korea)
Wonhyoung Ryu, Ph.D. (Yonsei University, Korea)
With advancement of nano-technology and biomedical science, convergence of nanotechnology and biomedical science has provided the basis, for various breakthroughs and follow-up applications of nanobiotechnology and medicine. This convergence between nanotechnology and biotechnology & medicine is becoming increasingly relevant to our lives. This session will look into recent translational research and applications in nanobiomedical convergence in the vision-threatening problem, retinopathy. In particular, this session will provide a successful example of translational research using nanobiomedical convergence in retinopathy. From this session, audience can easily follow-up recent innovative researchs and applications in the fields of nanobiotechnology and nanomedicine. based on retinopathy translational research.

Organizer & Chair: Jeong Hun Kim, Ph.D. (Seoul National University College of Medicine, Korea)
Sym. 14 The Wnt-Catenin Signaling and Its Cross-Talk in the Tumorigenesis
September 13 (Wed), 16:00-18:00, Rm. 401
Eek-Hoon Jho, Ph.D. (University of Seoul, Korea)
Kang-Yell Choi, Ph.D. (Yonsei University, Korea)
Nick Barker, Ph.D. (A*Star Institute & National University of Singapore, Singapore)
Hyunggee Kim, Ph.D. (Korea University, Korea)
Hyun Woo Park, Ph.D. (Yonsei University, Korea)
The Wnt/β-catenin pathway plays pivotal roles in various pathophysiologies including cancer and stem cell differentiation. In this session of the symposium, speakers will present data and discuss the cross-talk of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway with other pathways such as the Ras-ERK, Hippo, and Hedgehog pathways etc. The outcome of the signaling cross-talk will be related with several different types of cancers including colorectal cancer and glioma etc. Molecular basis of cancer stem cell activation related with abnormalities of the signaling cross-talk will also be discussed. The advanced knowledge and discussion for these important signaling pathways will provide us critical insights into the relationship between fundamental nature of cellular signaling and human cancer.

Organizer : Kang-Yell Choi, Ph.D. (Yonsei University, Korea)
Co-Chairs : Kang-Yell Choi, Ph.D. (Yonsei University, Korea)
                   Eek-Hoon Jho, Ph.D. (University of Seoul, Korea)
Sym. 15 New Perspectives on Bioactive Lipids
September 13 (Wed), 16:00-18:00, Rm. 402
Tack-Joong Kim, Ph.D. (Yonsei University, Korea)
Koanhoi Kim, Ph.D. (Pusan National University School of Medicine, Korea)
Ki Woo Kim, Ph.D. (Yonsei University, Korea)
Tae-Sik Park, Ph.D. (Gachon University, Korea)
Susumu Mitsutake, Ph.D. (Saga University, Japan)
Bioactive lipids are critical regulators of many diseases. Over the last 75 years, these diverse compounds have emerged as clinically-relevant mediators of disease pathophysiology. Animal and human studies have demonstrated the importance of lipid mediators in the development of many diseases. Here, we will talk classes of bioactive lipids with special emphasis on lipid synthesis pathways and signaling, the disease pathology, and the ongoing development of the treatments targeting lipid mediator pathways.

Organizer & Chair: Tack-Joong Kim, Ph.D. (Yonsei University, Korea)

September 14 (Thu), 2017

Sym. 16 Novel Genetic and Epigenetic Modules Underlying Animal
               Physiology
September 14 (Thu), 09:10-11:10, Rm. 300
Seung-Jae V. Lee, Ph.D. (Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Korea)
Kaveh Ashrafi, Ph.D. (University of California, San Francisco, USA)
Junho Lee, Ph.D. (Seoul National University, Korea)
Kyuhyung Kim, Ph.D. (Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), Korea)
Jae-Seok Roe, Ph.D. (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, USA)
Genetic and epigenetic regulation plays a central role in gene expression underlying animal physiology, including development, neural function, tumorigenesis and aging. In this symposium we will extend our current understanding of genetic constituents and their molecular mechanisms underlying animal physiology using mainly C. elegans as a model system. Kaveh Ashrafi (UCSF) will present his work on how metabolism and nervous systems are interconnected for the regulation of animal physiology. In addition, three leading principle investigators will talk about their recent work on genome stability (Joon-Ho Lee), neuronal circuitry (Kyu-Hyung Kim) and animal lifespan (Seung-Jae V. Lee). In addition, Jae Seok Roe will discuss the role of epigenetic regulation in mammalian cancer progression.

Co-Organizers & Chairs: Sang-Dong Yoo, Ph.D. (Korea University, Korea)
                                           Seung-Jae V. Lee, Ph.D. (Pohang University of Sciecne and Techology (POSTECH), Korea)
Sym. 17 Chemoresistance in Cancer Therapy
September 13 (Thu), 09:10-11:10, Rm. 307
Dean G. Tang, Ph.D. (Roswell Park Cancer Institute, USA)
Ming Tan, M.D., Ph.D. (Mitchell Cancer Institute, USA)
Kyung Keun Kim, M.D., Ph.D. (Chonnam National University Medical School, Korea)
Tae Gyu Choi, Ph.D. (Kyung Hee University, Korea)
Sun Shin, TBA (The Catholic University, Korea)
Since Dr. Farber introduced chemotherapy for the pediatric leukemia patients in 1949, it has been improved quite much and helped a lot of patients to survive for an extensive period of time. However, recurrence and metastasis still remain a major obstacle that should be overcome to eventually eradicatie or control cancers. To achieve this goal, basic and clinical studies to explore the underlying mechanisms of chemoresistance need to be performed further. In this symposium, the speakers will discuss about the most updated knowledge on the mechanisms of chemoresistance and provide the new way to tackle the chemoresistance, leading to development of new chemotherapeutic agents that will help cancer patients in the clinic.

Organizer & Chair: Sung Soo Kim, Ph.D. (Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Korea)
Sym. 18 Mitochondrial Metabolism and Mitophagy
September 14 (Thu), 09:10-11:10, Rm. 308
Nicolas Demaurex, Ph.D. (University of Geneva, Swiss)
Myung-Shik Lee, M.D., Ph.D. (Yonsei University College of Medicine, Korea)
Minho Shong, M.D. (Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Korea)
Kyu-Sun Lee, Ph.D. (Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), Korea)
Jeanho Yun, Ph.D. (Dong-A University, Korea)
Dongryeol Ryu, Ph.D. (Pusan National University, Korea)
Unbalanced diet and physical inactivity give continuous stress to mitochondria, playing a critical role in pathogenesis of chronic metabolic diseases. To overcome or prevent this crisis, cells operate highly conserved protective mechanisms such as autophagy-mediated quality control or unfolded protein response in mitochondria. This session will provide informative background knowledge and cutting edge discoveries about physiologic regulations as well as pathophysiologic alterations in mitochondrial metabolism, mitoUPR and mitophagy, which may give us insight about biomedical research to identify the therapeutic targets for metabolic diseases.

Organizer & Chair: Kyu-Sang Park, M.D., Ph.D. (Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Korea)
Sym. 19 Hippocampus and Memory
September 14 (Thu), 09:10-11:10, Rm. 401
Doyun Lee, Ph.D. (Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Korea)
Jong Won Lee, Ph.D. (Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Korea)
Mayank Mehta, Ph.D. (University of California, Los Angeles, USA)
Sebastien Royer (Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Korea)
One of the central issues in neuroscience is to understand the neural basis of learning and memory. Although it is well known that the hippocampus plays a crucial role in remembering facts and events, its underlying neural mechanisms remain unclear despite a long history of intensive investigations. In the proposed symposium, we will focus on recent experimental findings from neurophysiological, optogenetics, and behavioral studies in rodents. These studies are revealing cellular and microcircuit processes underlying memorial operations of different sub-regions of the hippocampus. The symposium promotes junior scientists by involving researchers at different career stages, from associate scientist (Jongwon Lee) to junior PI (Doyun Lee) and mid-stage to senior investigators (Sebastien Royer and Mayank Mehta).

Organizer & Chair: Min Whan Jung, Ph.D. (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Korea)
Sym. 20 Regulation of Cellular Network and Extracellular Matrix in Tumor                Microenvironment
September 14 (Thu), 09:10-11:10, Rm. 402
Jiyoung Park, Ph.D. (Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Korea)
Mikala Egeblad, Ph.D. (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, USA)
Jin Ho Chung, M.D., Ph.D. (Seoul National University College of Medicine, Korea)
Sang Geon Kim, Ph.D. (Seoul National University, Korea)
Tumor cells dynamically interact with other cells in tumor microenvironment, such as tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), and also with extracellular matrix (ECM) surrounding them. This session will introduce the role for the cell-cell networks and cell-ECM interactions in tumor survival and metastasis, and current anti-cancer therapies based on the regulation of these interactions.

Co-Organizers & Chairs: Byungheon Lee, M.D, Ph.D. (Kyungpook National University, Korea)
                                          Seung-Hyo Lee, Ph.D. (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Korea)